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Top Nature Attractions Of Georgia, USA

  1. Jacks River Falls
Jacks River Falls
Jacks River Falls

Hiking through the remote yet scenic Chattahoochee National Forest will bring you face to face to this picturesque natural beauty – Jacks River Falls. The Beech Bottom Trail, about 9 miles round trip, actually starts from the neighboring state of Tennessee. The mildly challenging trail leads into Georgia within a quarter mile. After about 3 miles, you will reach the Falls, the most anticipated and scenic part of this trail. Take a photo, make a splash, and enjoy the moment.

 

  1. Providence Spring
Providence Spring
Providence Spring

You do not need to hike or take a long drive to get to this attraction. But the legend behind this natural spring makes it a must-visit attraction. The story goes that sometime in the mid 1800s, many Union Army prisoners-of-war were in a deplorable state in a prison camp in Andersonville. In the summer that followed, it became worse in the sweltering heat and the prisoners prayed for a miracle. And miracle is what happened. A storm broke out and a lightning struck the ground from where a natural spring appeared, saving hundreds of lives. The spring – now protected by a beautiful marble shelter – still flows and is within walking distance from the Andersonville town center.

 

  1. Lula Falls
Lula Falls
Lula Falls

This attraction certainly ranks among the top hidden nature attractions of Georgia. It is located in northern Georgia, about 10 miles south west of Chattanooga. Take the Lula Lake Road south  for 3 miles from the Lookout Mountain to get to the Lula Falls. Both the Lula Lake and the Lula Falls are protected by the Lula Lake Land Trust, ensuring that the original natural beauty is not affected by tourism or any other factor. The place is one of scenic beauty and peaceful bliss. And the lack of tourists makes it even more enjoyable. Just soak in the beauty or put on your swimsuit and make a splash.

 

  1. Bridal Veil Falls
Bridal Veil Falls
Bridal Veil Falls

Why visit a water park if you can slide down a natural waterslide? The Bridal Veil Falls, also known as the Sliding Falls, offers a fun and wild slide down a natural waterfall embankment. The Falls are part of the greater Tallulah Falls, located in the Tallulah Gorge State Park in north eastern Georgia. It is quite a popular attraction in the region, attracting a decent footfall in the summer months. Although the trail can be a bit challenging, and you have to procure a permit to get to this Falls, the place remains crowded during the summer months, especially on weekends.

 

  1. Oh La La Lavender Farm
Oh La La Lavender Farm
Oh La La Lavender Farm

Hardly 7 miles north west of the town of Eatonton, and you are in one of the most beautiful flower gardens in Georgia. The Oh La La Lavender Farm, is, just as the name suggests, a lavender farm. Looking like a never-ending blanket of purple, these flowers will make you Georgia Spring all the more colorful. The farm allows tourists into the farm to not only enjoy the flowers but also to watch the harvesting and drying. There is a shop from where you can buy freshly cut flowers along with several other products made with the farm-fresh lavender. And that’s not all! The farm is home to several animals which are also quite a hit with the tourists.

 

  1. Cherokee Falls
Cherokee Falls
Cherokee Falls

You have to travel to northwest Georgia to get to this attraction. The Cherokee Falls is located inside the Cloudland Canyon State Park, on the western flank of the Lookout Mountain. With an area of 3485 acres, it is one of the largest state parks in Georgia. The moderately challenging Waterfalls Trail will lead you to the Cherokee Falls, which is also known as Falls One. Further down, you will come across the Hemlock Falls, also known as Falls Two. Both the falls are fed by the Daniel Creek. However, Cherokee Falls takes the cake for its pristine blue waters, a rare sight in the state of Georgia.

 

  1. Cumberland Island
Cumberland Island
Sunrise at Cumberland Island

Sandwiched between Jekyll Island in Georgia and Jacksonville in neighboring Florida, Cumberland Island is usually overshadowed by its illustrious neighbors. And that is what exactly makes this place more appealing. The pristine remoteness is ideal to soak in the beauty of this place. From watching wild horses galloping around to camping under the stars, Cumberland Island is truly a haven for nature lovers and outdoor enthusiasts. A man-made attraction on Cumberland Island that you should not miss is the Dungeness – the ruins of the hunting mansion from 1733 built by James Oglethorpe, the founder of the colony of Georgia.

 

  1. Wormsloe Historic Site
Wormsloe Historic Site
Wormsloe Historic Site

Hardly 7 miles south east of downtown Savannah, and you are in the midst of the one of the most picturesque natural attractions of Georgia. Although the site cover 822 acres, it is a 1.5 mile stretch of oak-tree lined avenue that attracts tourists. Driving or walking through that avenue will make you feel as if you are walking through a tunnel of oak trees. The dripping Spanish moss adds to the visual appeal. The site protects the 18th century Wormsloe Plantation of Noble Jones, one of the founders of the colony of Georgia.

 

  1. Providence Canyon
Providence Canyon
Providence Canyon

Yes, you read that right. Georgia does have its own canyon. It even has its own state park to protect this natural wonder! The Providence Canyon State Park is located 40 miles south of Columbus. It protects nearly 1000 acres of the canyon which is often dubbed the Little Grand Canyon. There are actually 16 different patches of these canyons. While some argue natural geological erosion created the canyon, others believe the reason to be erosion from faulty agricultural practices. But no one is complaining. Ample opportunities for hiking, camping, and picnicking make this a truly fun place to visit.

 

  1. Radium Springs
Radium Springs
Radium Springs

Radium Spring is a popular attraction that is located to the south of the city of Albany. Listed as one of the 7 Natural Wonders of Georgia, this natural spring is the largest in the state with an outflow of 70,000 gallons per minute. It empties into the Flint River. The springs were originally known as Blue Springs because of the blue hue of the water. Although the water is not fit for swimming, the beautiful color of the spring and the surrounding natural scenery make it a popular place for a stroll.

 

  1. Okefenokee Swamp
Okefenokee Swamp
Okefenokee Swamp

Visited by nearly half a million tourists from all across the globe, this is one of the most popular nature attractions in Georgia. The Okefenokee Swamp, located in southeast Georgia, is protected by the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. It is the largest blackwater swamp in the country. You can enter the swamp park through Folkston, Waycross, or Fargo. Take a boat excursion to watch the wildlife of the swamp, which includes the American Alligator, turtles, and several birds of prey. The swamp also has a 90-foot tall observation tower. There are many guided tours available from both Folkston and Waycross.

 

  1. Chattahoochee River
Chattahoochee River
Tubing at Chattahoochee River

The Chattahoochee River has long been a popular attraction for Georgians. Come summer time and you will have hundreds, if not thousands, making a splash in the lazy waters of this river. Another popular activity is tubing, where you leisurely float in colorful inflated tubes on the river. There are many tubing companies offering tubes for rent and even a ride back to where you started from. The river is over 400 miles long so there are several recreational spots along its journey. If you are not sure which place to pick, try the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, 20 miles north of downtown Atlanta.

Originally posted 2017-08-23 12:54:19.

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