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Top 12 Tourist Attractions of Boston

Boston is the capital and the largest city in the northern American state of Massachusetts. Founded in 1630, it is also one of the oldest cities in the US. Boston is rich in history and culture, attracting tourists from all over the US and beyond. Its neighboring city of Cambridge is home to 2 of the premier educational institutes in the world, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. Boston is one of the most prominent cities of the American Revolution. It has been witness to many major historical events, most notably the Boston Tea Party. The Freedom Trail is a great way to explore the rich cultural heritage of this city. Museums, parks, galleries, and many other attractions of the city  are conveniently linked by America’s first subway system – the T.

 

  1. New England Aquarium
New England Aquarium
New England Aquarium

The New England Aquarium is located in harbor area, just south of the Christopher Columbus Waterfront Park. It opened in 1969 and is currently one of the top attractions of the city, attracting over 1.3 million visitors. It displays over 20,000 marine animals belonging to 600 different species. It has a number of galleries in the facility like the World Gallery, Tropical Gallery, Freshwater Gallery, and the Temperate Gallery. Other attractions of New England Aquarium are the Whale Watch, touch tank, and an IMAX Theater.

 

  1. Fenway Park
Fenway Park
Lone Red Seat at the Fenway Park

Fenway Park is the oldest ball park in the US Major League Baseball. The park was opened in 1912 and is home to the Boston Red Sox. Many of the original sections of the park have been retained, like the hand-operated scoreboard, giving the park a nostalgic feel. Fenway Park seats just about 37,730 people, the lowest in MLB. This also means, getting a match ticket at the Fenway is a rather uphill task. However, you can always take a tour of the ground and have a behind-the-scenes look into ‘America’s Most Beloved Ballpark’. See if you can locate the Lone Red Seat in the stands. It marks the longest home run – 502 feet – hit by Ted Williams in 1946.

 

  1. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is a prominent art museum with a significant collection of artwork from all over the world. It is named after its founder who was an avid art patron. The museum was founded in 1903 and is housed in a building resembling a 15th century Venetian palace. Due to its growing popularity, the museum went through several renovations and expansions over the years. Out of its collection of 2500, some of its most prized artworks include the Rape of Europa by Titian, Colonna Pieta by Michelangelo, and Lady in Black by Tintoretto.  Isabella was known for her eccentricities and quirky lifestyle. According to her wish, visitors wearing Boston Red Sox shirts get discounted tickets, and anyone named Isabella has free entry to the museum!

 

  1. Symphony Hall
Symphony Hall
Symphony Hall

Symphony Hall is a concert hall and home to the Boston Symphonic Orchestra. It was constructed in 1900 and has since remained one of the top 3 concert halls in the world for its acoustics. It has a seating capacity of around 2500. The leather seats in the hall are the originals that were installed in 1900. Watching a performance at Symphony Hall is an experience in itself as the Boston Symphonic Orchestra is one of the Big Five in the US. The Renaissance building adds to the charm.

 

  1. Faneuil Hall
Faneuil Hall
Faneuil Hall

The Faneuil Hall is a historic landmark and a popular attraction located in downtown Boston. It is a Georgian-styled market hall from 1742. The owner, a merchant named Peter Faneuil, gifted it to the city on condition that it would always have free access to the public. While the ground floor is populated by shops and stalls, the upper floors house the council chamber and the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Museum. The building used to be a meeting place for the revolutionaries in the 18th and 19th centuries, earning it the nickname ‘cradle of liberty.’ Right next to Hall is the buzzing Faneuil Hall Marketplace.

 

  1. Museum of Science
Museum of Science
Museum of Science

This a science museum as well as an indoor zoo that is located in Science Park on Huntington Avenue. It was established in 1830. The museum has a number of interactive displays along with its collection of fossils and scientific objects. Physics, chemistry, biology, along with zoology, astronomy, and computers are explored in the museum. It is an attraction enjoyed by kids and adults alike. The complex also has a planetarium and a domed IMAX theater. The small indoor zoo has a collection of about 100 animals, many of which were given shelter for rehabilitation.

 

  1. John F Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
John F Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
John F Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

As the name suggests, this museum and library is dedicated to the 25th president of the US, John F Kennedy. It is located in the Dorchester neighborhood along the Boston Harborwalk. The museum traces the life of Kennedy as the President with many replicas and artifacts. It also has a section dedicated to his wife Jacqueline Kennedy.

 

  1. Museum of Fine Arts
Museum of Fine Arts
Museum of Fine Arts

The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston is one of the most prominent cultural attractions in the city. It founded in 1870. However, it moved to its present location on Huntington Avenue in 1909. The museum is considered to have one of the most comprehensive art collections in the US. It attracts over a million visitors every year. Some of the highlights of this museum include the Egyptian artifacts, artwork from the French impressionist age, and an impressive collection of Chinese paintings and calligraphy. The museum also has the largest collection of Japanese artwork outside Japan.

 

  1. Harvard Art Museums
Harvard Art Museums
Harvard Art Museums

Although Harvard University is located in neighboring Cambridge city, it is often taken to be a part of the Greater Boston area. Other than the university complex itself, a major attraction of Cambridge is the Harvard Art Museums. It comprises of the Fogg Museum, Busch-Reisinger Museum, Arthur M Sackier Museum, and 4 research centers. Attractions in these museums number more than a quarter million and date back from the prehistoric times to the present era. Other than many artifacts and documents, the museums have an impressive collection of artwork from all over the world. If you are planning to visit this attraction, then it is best to keep aside the best part of your day.

 

  1. Boston Common
Boston Common
Boston Common

Boston Common, or simply the Common, is the oldest public park in the US, It was established in 1634 and currently covers 50 acres in the downtown Boston neighborhood. Over the years, the park has been used in many roles. It was originally a privately owned park which later became a grazing ground for cows. It was even used by the British forces during the American Revolutionary War. Presently, the park is a popular meeting place. Concerts, softball games, and ice skating are popular at the park. Many famous personalities have also made speeches at this park including Martin Luther King Jr, Pope John Paul II, and Mikhail Gorbachev.  Do not forget to ride the iconic Swan Boat on the park pond. These boats have been operating since 1877!

 

  1. Boston Harbor
Boston Harbor
Boston Harbor

A trip to Boston is not compete without visiting the Boston Harbor. It was discovered by the British in 1614 and has since been the backdrop of many historic events of the American History, most notably the Boston Tea Party. The harbor was redeveloped in the 1970s and has since become a popular place to hang out for locals and visitors alike. There are a number of islets in close proximity which are part of the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. A great way to enjoy the harbor is by walking along the Harborwalk.

 

  1. Freedom Trail
Freedom Trail
Freedom Trail

This 2.5 mile red-brick walking trail is the best way to explore the history of Boston and its association with the American Revolution. Although the trail is not very long, it could still take the better part of the day because of the several attractions and landmarks. The best place to start would be from the Park Street subway station in downtown Boston. Walk north along Tremont Street, then take a right at School Street up to Washington Street. Turn left on Washington Street. The trail will take you to Congress Street and finally North Street. It ends at the Bunker Hill Monument across the Charles River. Notable landmarks on the trail include Old City Hall, Old State House, Boston Massacre Site, Paul Revere House, and Cop’s Hill Burying Ground.

Originally posted 2017-09-05 06:58:29.

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